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Julia Hamilton Sch - History

Julia Hamilton Sch - History


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Julia Hamilton

A former name retained.

(Sch : 1. 55'; b. 16'; 4'6" ; cpl. 3; a. none)

Julia Hamilton, a wooden schooner, was acquired by the Navy from the Maryland Conservation Commission and enrolled in the Naval Coast Defense Reserve 17 August 1917. Assigned to the 5th Naval District, she served in Cheasapeake Bay out of Norfolk, Va. She was returned to her owner 28 March 1918.


History

In 1884, five young women who were not content with the educations they had received vowed to work together to plan for better schools and a more serious education for girls that would be equal to or greater than what boys received at the time. Martha Carey Thomas emerged as the natural leader of "The Committee," as the group called themselves. Thomas came from a prominent family: her father was a well-known physician and philanthropist who served on the board of directors of both The Johns Hopkins University and Haverford College, while her mother was a leader in the Quaker religious movement and a well-known preacher at Quaker Meetings. Thomas herself had attended Quaker schools in Baltimore and subsequently graduated from Cornell in 1877. After graduating, she returned to Baltimore hoping to pursue a graduate degree at Hopkins. Because of her gender, however, she was only reluctantly admitted to "private study," and was barred from attending seminars and lectures. She resigned the following year in frustration and ultimately traveled to Zurich to pursue her doctorate. Her traveling partner was Martha Mackall "Mamie" Gwinn, a childhood friend who would later become a member of "The Committee." Thomas was successful in completing her doctoral studies and graduated summa cum laude in 1882.

Upon her return to Baltimore, she had the ambition of becoming affiliated in some way with the Bryn Mawr College, which was taking shape in the suburbs of Philadelphia. With the help of several members of her family who were serving on the new college's board, Thomas was chosen as the first dean of the college, and she eventually became the college's second president. Her tasks in Philadelphia made her even more mindful of the needs in Baltimore. A new college with very high standards would seek well-educated young women to fill its classrooms, and Baltimore needed to provide better educational opportunities for girls. She wondered, why couldn't these two ideas work together? So, Thomas and four like-minded women friends in Baltimore – Gwinn, Mary Elizabeth Garrett, Julia Rogers and Elizabeth King – all of whom were in their 20s, got to work, rented a schoolhouse, collected a faculty, and prepared to go into business.


Contents

Stadium development Edit

Initial plans for the stadium were for it to be a principal Pan American stadium for soccer and track and field/athletics events. However, disputes between the Tiger-Cats owner, Bob Young, the organizers of the 2015 Pan American Games, and the City of Hamilton arose over the location of the stadium, [10] among other things, including whether or not a running track should be built around the proposed stadium in Hamilton.

In 2012, the 2015 Pan-Am organizers indicated that, due to financial constraints, they would be shifting their focus toward venues and "clusters" that could be used for multiple events, which might eliminate the need for a new stadium that would be used only for soccer, and they proposed another stadium on the campus of York University, tentatively named York Athletics Stadium, to host the track and field events. That, coupled with a scheduling process that had soccer and rugby sevens events on different days (thus opening the possibility that Toronto's BMO Field, which would house the rugby sevens contests in 2015 might also be able to host the soccer contests), had the potential to put the Hamilton stadium project in jeopardy. Nonetheless, the Hamilton stadium project went forward as planned.

In July 2013, it was announced that Tim Hortons, the international restaurant chain that originated in Hamilton some fifty years earlier, had acquired naming rights to the stadium. [11]

Construction and opening Edit

The new stadium was constructed in 2013 and into early-mid 2014 on the site of the former Ivor Wynne Stadium, which was demolished in the process, and it opened for Canadian Football League (CFL) football in late 2014. The stadium currently seats approximately 24,000 spectators for Canadian football, with expansion potential to boost capacity to more than 40,000 seats for special events (such as hosting a Grey Cup contest) in the future. [12] The design of the new stadium also increased the width of the field to accommodate soccer games by meeting FIFA's international standards for association football pitches reoriented the playing field from east–west to a north–south orientation increased the seat width and leg room/corridor space to make it one of the most spacious among Canadian sports venues incorporated extensive wireless communications infrastructure and washroom facilities as well as adding luxury boxes, and other modern amenities. The stadium field surface is FIFA- and CFL-approved artificial turf. [12]

The CFL's Toronto Argonauts played two home games at Tim Hortons Field in 2015, due to clashes with the MLB's Toronto Blue Jays playoffs games. The stadium has also occasionally hosted special games for Hamilton's amateur football teams the Hamilton Hurricanes of the Canadian Junior Football League played a game in the stadium in 2015 [13] and the McMaster Marauders football team played its 2016 Labour Day contest at the field in a doubleheader with the Tiger-Cats. [14] The Hurricanes returned to the field twice in 2017, the latter being its own Labour Day contest. [15]

In January 2015, U Sports awarded Tim Hortons Field hosting rights to the 52nd and 53rd Vanier Cup, held in November 2016 and November 2017 respectively. [16]

Forge FC, a new soccer team owned by the Tiger-Cats, have played at the stadium in the Canadian Premier League since 2019. [17] During the 2019 season, Tim Hortons Field hosted the first ever CPL match in April, [18] and the first ever CPL Finals match in October. [19]

Since the stadium opened in 2014 there have been numerous issues regarding the quality of the construction. The City of Hamilton has spent upwards of $2.5 million in fixes and safety repairs [20] including: replacing rain-damaged television screens and faulty baby-changing tables, installing draft beer lines, improving ventilation, sealing leaky expansion joints and repairing faulty floor drains. [21]


Angelica Schuyler Church

John Trumbull / Wikimedia Commons

The eldest of the Schuyler children, Angelica (February 20, 1756–March 13, 1814) was born and raised in Albany, New York. Thanks to her father’s political influence and his position as a general in the Continental Army, the Schuyler family home was often a site of political intrigue. Meetings and councils were held there, and Angelica and her siblings came into regular contact with well-known figures of the time, like John Barker Church, a member of the British Parliament who frequented Schuyler's war councils.

Church made himself a sizable fortune during the Revolutionary War by selling supplies to the French and Continental armies—making him persona non grata in his home country of England. Church managed to issue a number of financial credits to banks and shipping companies in the fledgling United States, and after the war, the U.S. Treasury Department was unable to pay him back in cash. Instead, it offered him a 100,000-acre tract of land in western New York State.


Why Elizabeth Hamilton Is Deserving of a Musical of Her Own

When calls for a female replacement on the ten-dollar bill erupted last year, online petitioners nominated a host of historical role models to step in for Alexander Hamilton. But one powerful, influential woman, who aided the creation of our national financial system, went unnoticed—Hamilton’s wife, Elizabeth.

Related Content

The musical Hamilton, which opened on Broadway last August, has received universal acclaim for many reasons – its melding of hip-hop with Broadway, its ability to make history “fun” and its stunning performances, including Phillipa Soo’s spirited portrayal of Elizabeth (or Eliza, as she was sometimes called). To prepare for the role, Soo dove into Ron Chernow’s definitive biography of Alexander Hamilton, the source material for Hamilton’s songwriter, lyricist and lead actor Lin-Manuel Miranda. “I think I was most surprised about how much she loved Alexander,” Soo says. “[Eliza] seemed to be driven by her desire to honor her late husband, to tell his story.”

As told by Chernow and Miranda, Elizabeth helped Alexander draft political essays, correspond with heads of state, and raise a large family. After her husband’s death in American history’s most famous duel, Elizabeth recast her public image as a philanthropist and protector of Hamilton’s legacy, while privately struggling to keep her family fed and housed on a budget. She outlived her husband by 50 years, and made the most of her extraordinarily long and tumultuous life.

Elizabeth Schuyler was born on August 9, 1757, the daughter of the Revolutionary War leader Major General Philip Schuyler. Her mother, Catherine van Rensselaer, descended from one of New York’s richest families. A portrait painted in the 1780s shows Elizabeth posed in a Marie Antoinette-style wig, veil and silver gown, but her dark eyes sparkle with humor and her lips press together in a knowing smile, revealing the endearing cleft in her chin.

Her eyes “betokened a sharp intelligence [and] a fiercely indomitable spirit,” Chernow writes in the biography.

Elizabeth, her sisters Angelica and Peggy, and other siblings grew up surrounded by visiting military officers and patriots. She made quite an impression with her witty, yet practical, personality—especially on General George Washington’s chief aide, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton. He seemed to have been smitten from the moment he met her during the winter of 1779-1780.

“She is most unmercifully handsome and so perverse that she has none of those pretty affectations which are the prerogatives of beauty…She has good nature, affability and vivacity unembellished with that charming frivolousness which is justly deemed one of the principal accomplishments of a belle. In short she is so strange a creature, that she possesses all the beauties, virtues and graces of her sex without any of those amiable defects which from their general prevalence are esteemed by connoisseurs necessary shades in the character of a fine woman.” Hamilton wrote to Angelica. He hinted that the army’s chances would be in doubt if Elizabeth didn’t accept his courtship.

She did, and married Hamilton at her family’s home on December 14, 1780. While Hamilton shaped the economic philosophy of the new nation, Elizabeth bore eight children, helped her husband write speeches (including Washington’s Farewell Address), and presided over a happy, lively home. In upper Manhattan, the Hamiltons built an airy country house they called the Grange. Today, the National Park Service manages the yellow Federal-style mansion as Hamilton Grange National Memorial.,

Alexander enjoyed the Grange for just two years. On July 11, 1804, his former colleague Aaron Burr shot him in a duel over a petty insult. Alexander died the following day, with Elizabeth and their children by his side.

Now widowed, with seven children—her eldest, Philip, had died in a duel three years before, with the same pistols—Elizabeth faced tragedy on top of tragedy. Her father died, and her eldest daughter suffered a nervous breakdown. Creditors repossessed the Grange, but Elizabeth scraped together enough money to buy it back—a demonstration of the dogged resourcefulness that got her family through lean times. Her son James remembered her as “a skillful house-wife, expert at making sweetmeats and pastry she made the undergarments for her children, was a great economist and most excellent manager.”

Grieving, but now out of her husband’s shadow, Elizabeth threw herself into charity work inspired by her Christian faith and her husband’s upbringing. She and two other women founded the Orphan Asylum Society, New York City’s first private orphanage, in 1806. She served as its second directress until 1821 and then first directress until 1848, raising funds, collecting donated goods, and supervising the care and education of at least 765 children. She took a particular interest in a poor boy named Henry McKavit (or McKavett) whose parents had died in a fire. Elizabeth personally paid for his schooling and arranged a military commission for him at West Point. When he was killed by a cannonball in the Mexican-American War, he left his whole estate to the orphanage.

Her own home was less stable. In 1833, 76-year-old Elizabeth sold the Grange and moved downtown into a Federal-style townhouse with her daughter Eliza, son Alexander and their families. After Eliza’s husband died and she moved to Washington D.C. in 1842, Elizabeth often traveled to visit her daughter in the capital, where she always received a flurry of invitations, including from Presidents Tyler, Polk and Pierce. At a dinner for about 40 guests, Polk remarked in his diary that “Mrs. General Hamilton, upon whom I waited at table, is a very remarkable person. She retains her intellect and memory perfectly, and my conversation with her was highly interesting.”

In 1848, Elizabeth—now 91 years old—moved in with her daughter for good. She held court at Eliza’s home on H Street between 13th and 14th Streets NW, near the White House. Hundreds of dignitaries came to pay their respects, including their next-door neighbor, General Winfield Scott Senator William Seward of New York, and President Millard Fillmore. In his diary, Seward didn’t share Polk’s opinion of Elizabeth’s frame of mind. “She talked sensibly of her husband and her papers but her memory of current events and contemporaneous persons has ceased altogether,” he wrote.

Elizabeth usually insisted they drink a glass from the silver wine cooler George Washington gave to her husband. Some visitors sought her imprimatur for new legislation, while others went simply to bask in the glow of history. “She was the last living link to the Revolutionary era,” says Liam Strain, chief of operations for Hamilton Grange and other Park Service sites. “She was a very powerful woman, especially so because she hadn’t been a First Lady.”

Not everyone received a warm reception, however. Elizabeth never forgave former president James Monroe for leaking details of the Reynolds Affair, an embarrassing scandal dating to 60 years earlier. When Monroe called to ask for a truce, she pointedly refused to offer him a seat. He delivered his entreaty, standing in the middle of the parlor, and again, Elizabeth declined to bury the hatchet. “No lapse of time, no nearness to the grave, makes any difference,” Elizabeth’s nephew remembered her saying.

Elizabeth fiercely defended her husband in other ways. She insisted that Hamilton had been the principal author of the final version of Washington’s Farewell Address, and not James Madison, who had written an early draft of the speech. She wanted to further burnish his Federalist legacy, which had by then fallen out of favor, by collecting his papers for publication. She sent questionnaires to dozens of his former colleagues to verify details in Hamilton’s letters and affairs. After hunting in vain for a suitable editor, she had her son John Church Hamilton edit the collection, which was finally completed in 1861.

Without Elizabeth’s work, Chernow says, his biography of Alexander Hamilton—and by extension, the smash musical it is based on—would have been difficult to conceive. “Her efforts made it easier to research Alexander’s life, because after his death, his enemies were in power,” Chernow says. To collect the material, “Elizabeth was working against the political system of the time, and time itself.”

She also helped former First Lady Dolley Madison raise money for a monument to Hamilton’s mentor and friend, George Washington, on the National Mall. At the cornerstone-laying ceremony on July 4, 1848, Elizabeth rode in the procession alongside President Polk and future presidents James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson.

Many contemporaries remarked that Elizabeth was active until the end. That came on November 9, 1854, three months after her 97th birthday.

James Hamilton once complimented his mother’s heroic work for poor orphans, and she replied pragmatically, “My Maker has pointed out this duty to me, and has given me the skill and inclination to perform it.” She could have been speaking about her unceasing effort to honor her late husband.

“I think anyone else would have been broken” by the tragedies Elizabeth faced, Chernow says. “Not only did she live, she prevailed.”


Hyattsville’s history reaches far into the past with archeological record indicating nearly 8,000 years of human inhabitance. Algonquin- and Iroquois-speaking Indians resided here in the more recent millennium. The first European exploration came in 1608. Animal resources, primarily beaver, were a strong attraction and hunters could transport easily their hides along the area waterways and American Indian trails.

European settlers made land purchases in the area in the early 1700’s, calling these tracts Black Ask and New Dumfreeze. On John Beale’s Black Ask parcel, a small riverfront community formed, commonly known as Beale Town. By 1742, the residents petitioned the Maryland provincial legislature to move south because of dissatisfaction with their community’s location and economic development. Beale Town ceased to exist, but a few families remained on their individual properties.

In 1783 the first American stagecoach route passed through this area, followed two years later by a postal delivery route. With settlement came farming the local soil and slavery made tobacco production popular. Maryland authorized construction of the Washington and Baltimore Turnpike connecting the two cities via the Hyattsville area in 1812.

By 1828 the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad was chartered, its Washington Line connecting Washington, DC, and Baltimore in 1835. Christopher Clarke Hyatt purchased his first parcel of land here March 19, 1845. Hyatt opened a store and began mail delivery, officially naming the nascent community “Hyattsville” in his 1859 application to become postmaster. This ideal location at the intersection of the turnpike with its stagecoach line and mail route and the railroad with new telegraph lines alongside made the land perfect for development.

The end of the Civil War and slave-based economy forced the breakup of many of the larger plantations. The sale of this cheap land coincided with a booming federal government expanded by the war and a rise in property prices in Washington, DC. Neighboring Bladensburg’s Spa Springs, a resort, created a draw with its “healing” waters. Hyattsville’s location on the railroad made it a prime location for summer homes and a suburb.

Local residents, like Benjamin F. Guy, Thomas Parker, and Jeremiah Bartholow, joined Hyatt in subdividing and selling a small number of lots, while Washington, DC, developers Louis Wine and George Johnson sold lots on a large scale. Hyattsville’s population doubled. The Act of Incorporation for the City of Hyattsville was signed April 7, 1886. By 1890 Hyattsville was one of only two cities in Prince George’s County with a population greater than 1,000. Churches, schools, athletic groups, and civic organizations formed in reflection of the growing community. A small immigrant and African-American population made Hyattsville their home from its earliest days. In 1892, Hyattsville gained international fame when it became the first American city to institute the single-tax system, taxing only land and not personal property. The ensuing court decision provides standing for today’s tax code. The city also boasted the area’s first newspaper, phone system, and utilities. By 1893, the electric streetcar connected Hyattsville to Washington, DC, businesses, boosting the population ever higher.

Hyattsville as streetcar suburb was influenced early by the automobile. The Carter Motor Car Corporation located a factory here in 1908, producing a hand-built twin-engine automobile. A national women’s suffrage rally left Hyattsville via motorcade to petition the United State Senate July 31, 1913. Service stations, garages, auto dealerships, and tourist homes lined the city’s main thoroughfare. Some 6,000 vehicles traveled daily through town in 1925 when Hyattsville’s main road, Maryland Avenue, was federally designated Route 1, part of the main road from Maine to Florida. Hyattsville’s prominence in Prince George’s County was affirmed with the establishment of headquarters for the regional Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission and the County Government Services building, locating here in the 1930’s.

By the mid-1950’s, Hyattsville began to look much as it does today. An area-wide street-name change in 1941 erased the nod to early inhabitants. With the closing of the streetcar line and the opening of regional bus service, the older shops struggled. Housing and retail development like Prince George’s Plaza shopping mall and Northwestern High School claimed the surrounding farmland where truck farms once supplied residents with fresh produce. Early efforts to preserve Hyattsville’s historic buildings began in the late 1970’s. Homeowners formed a preservation association and documented the Hyattsville Historic District which was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 with nearly 1,000 buildings of vernacular Victorians, Colonial Revivals, Sears homes, and Arts and Crafts influences.

Hyattsville, at first glance, may be seen as a typical Washington, DC, suburb, with growth spurred by the railroad, streetcar, and automobile. However, its prominence in Prince George’s County was earned by its many firsts and innovative residents whose optimism and ingenuity make Hyattsville’s history unique.

To learn more exciting history facts, visit April1886.com.


6. Peggy Schuyler married well.

In June 1783, when she was almost 25, Peggy married a distant cousin, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, 19 it was likely an elopement. (In fact, Eliza was the only Schuyler sister who didn’t elope.) Stephen was a descendent of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, an Amsterdam merchant who was the first patroon—a person granted land and privileges by the Dutch government of New York—of a huge tract of land that included Albany county. This made Stephen a patroon as well, and he had plenty of money and servants. After her marriage, Peggy earned another nickname, this one bestowed upon her by Hamilton: “Mrs. Patroon.” By 1789, the couple had three children, only one of whom would survive to adulthood.


Hamilton Primary School

At Hamilton we have designed a curriculum that aims to enable all children to be able to read, write and add up by the time they have completed their education with us. We also focus on creating children who will be excellent citizens and be ready for their next stage of learning. We want children to learn, not because they have been told to, but because they want to. We look towards the National Curriculum, to ensure we cover the statutory requirements as set out by the Department for Education and we further supplement our curriculum with rich experiences based on our local area.

How do we implement our curriculum?

We plan our learning carefully, discussing potential topics with each other and the children. Our curriculum uses a mixture of knowledge and skills based learning to allow children to build on what they have learnt and apply this to new situations. This approach is constantly reviewed and we revisit how well children have learnt new knowledge and skills, how well they have retained this information, and how this can be adapted for our planning. We have produced a document that shows what we teach in each year group and the skills that might be associated with that learning. Please click this link to have a look at what we are teaching. This plan is reviewed throughout the year when changes occur, and is a working document.

How do we assess the impact of our curriculum?

The school looks at children's books, responses in lessons and any other information from assessments to inform us of how well we feel children have retained knowledge and skills and how they may have adapted these to new learning situations. This information is then used to support further learning throughout the year. The school divides its year in to 4 blocks of 10 weeks to enable children enough time to practice their learning and teachers to assess how well they have done. Our subject champions (teacher in charge of a subject such as Geography) spend time watching teaching and providing professional development to staff when they have identified an area of need. The school allows each subject champion between 1 and 0.5 days release each 10 weeks to further develop their subject.

British Values

From September 2014, schools within England have had a duty to promote British Values. The Department for Education (DfE) define them as:

  • Democracy
  • The rule of law
  • Individual liberty
  • Mutual respect
  • Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

English and Maths Curriculum

The school uses a number of resources and available schemes to plan learning in English and Maths. These are used to set learning that best suits each class and individual pupils. Currently the school uses White Rose Maths materials as its main scheme of work for maths supplemented by other resources in school. In English the school uses a number of different materials to support planning and teaching.

Foundation Subjects

Foundation Subjects are taught through topics. Each topic has a main focus such as Science, Geography or History. Some topics are taught as whole school units whilst others are taught as year group topics. Where possible, links are made to the English and Maths that is being taught in each class. The school uses visitors and trips to further extend pupils' experiences.

The school's Half Termly Curriculum Plans for each year group are shown below. They will be updated at the start of each half term. If you have any questions about what your child is learning, please make an appointment to see your child's class teacher.
Please click the links to open each plan.


Phonics Teaching

The school uses Letters and Sounds as its phonics programme. This is taught in Key Stage 1 to help our children to develop their reading skills. Information on this can be found on the letters and sounds website by clicking this link.

Our music curriculum is delivered through an online package called Charanga. Please click the link to find out more information about the scheme.

Computing learning is covered using the Knowsley Computing scheme of work. This has a number of programming elements and E-safety units.


Julia Agrippina

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Julia Agrippina, also called Agrippina the Younger, (born ad 15—died 59), mother of the Roman emperor Nero and a powerful influence on him during the early years of his reign (54–68).

Agrippina was the daughter of Germanicus Caesar and Vipsania Agrippina, sister of the emperor Gaius, or Caligula (reigned 37–41), and wife of the emperor Claudius (41–54). She was exiled in 39 for taking part in a conspiracy against Gaius but was allowed to return to Rome in 41. Her first husband, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, was Nero’s father. She was suspected of poisoning her second husband, Passienus Crispus, in 49. She married Claudius, her uncle, that same year and induced him to adopt Nero as heir to the throne in place of his own son. She also protected Seneca and Burrus, who were to be Nero’s tutors and advisers in the early part of his reign. She received the title of Augusta.

In 54 Claudius died. It was generally suspected that he was poisoned by Agrippina. Because Nero was only 16 when he succeeded Claudius, Agrippina at first attempted to play the role of regent. Her power gradually weakened, however, as Nero came to take charge of the government. As a result of her opposition to Nero’s affair with Poppaea Sabina, the Emperor decided to murder his mother. Inviting her to Baiae, he had her set forth on the Bay of Naples in a boat designed to sink, but she swam ashore. Eventually she was put to death on Nero’s orders at her country house.


Julia Hamilton Sch - History

The Woodrow Clay Hamilton, Jr. Collection of West Virginia High School and College Yearbooks

bold entries denote yearbooks added to the collection from other sources -A-

Alderson Baptist Academy and Junior College, (Alderson, Greenbrier County) "The Boardwalk," 1924 (Vol. I)

Alderson High School (Greenbrier County), "Indian Echoes," 1940, 1964, 1965 (Vol. 6), 1966, 1968

Alderson-Broaddus College, (Philippi, Barbour County), "Battler," 1926, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1962 (c. 2), 1968, 1969, 1973, 1975, 1982 (Vol.54)

Andrew Jackson Junior High School, (Cross Lanes, Kanawha County) "Jackson Journal," 1975 "Journal," , 1980, 1981 (2 copies), 1982, 1986
Andrew Jackson Middle School (Cross Lanes, Kanawha County), 2000, 2003, 2004

Ansted High School (Fayette County), "The Trail," 1929, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1966, 1969, 1971

Appalachian Bible College (Bradley, Raleigh County), "Gleaner," 1979

Arthurdale-Masontown High School (Preston County), (no name), 1956

Athens High School (Mercer County), "Trojan," 1969, 1970, 1985

Aurora High School (Preston County),"The Trailblazer," 1938 (Vol. II), 1939

Baileysville High School (Wyoming County), "Rough Rider," 1969

Barboursville High School (Cabell County), "The Torch," 1933, 1934, 1934 (c.2) "The Treasure Chest," 1947, 1947 (c.2), 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1956 (c.2), 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1962 (c.2), 1963, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1972 (2 copies), 1973 (2 copies), 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1975 (c.2), 1976, 1976 (c.2), 1977, 1978, 1978 (c.2), 1979, 1979 (c.2), 1980, 1980 (c.2), 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1985 (c.2), 1986, 1986 (c.2), 1987, 1988, 1994

Barboursville Junior High School (Cabell County), 1969, 1970, 1971 (2 copies), 1972, 1973

Barracksville High School (Marion County), "Bisoneer," 1975 (Vol. 34), 1976

Bath District High School (Berkeley Springs, Morgan County), "Warm Springs Echoes," 1929 (Vol.4), 1930

Bayard High School (Grant County), "Alligewinik," 1953

Battelle High School, (Wadestown, Monongalia County), "The Battelle," 1918 (Vol. 2), 1919

Beaver High School (Bluefield, Mercer County) "The Beaver," 1911, 1912, 1913, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1946, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1956
Bluefield High School, "The Beaver," 1960, 1964, 1968 (Vol.44), 1970, 1978, 1981, 1988, 1989.

Beckley College, (Raleigh County), "The Beckolegian," 1937 (Vol. I), 1940 (Vol.II), 1953, 1955

Beckley Institute, (Raleigh County), 1908-09

Beckley Junior High School (Raleigh County), "Eaglet," 1970

Belington High School (Barbour County), "High View," 1929 (Vol. I)

Berkeley Springs High School, (Morgan County), "The Arrowhead," 1963, 1964, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2009

Bethany College (Bethany, Brooke County), "The Meteor," 1898 "The Kodak," 1906, 1907, "The Bethanian," 1909 (Vol.VIII), 1911, 1912, 1915, 1916, 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941 "Bethany Log," 1944 "The Bethanian," 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1973 (c.2), 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999-2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2006-2007

Bethany High School (Brooke County), "The Bisonian," 1967

Beverly High School (Randolph County), "Wildcat," 1951, 1953 (Photo Book, grades 2-12), 1954, 1955 (Vol. 7), 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1963

Beverly Hills Junior High School (Huntington, Cabell County), "Blackhawks," 1980, 1981

Big Creek High School (War, McDowell County), "Memoirs," 1952, 1954, 1955, 1956 (2 copies), 1957 (2 copies), 1958, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1969, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1978, 1994, 1998

Big Sandy District High School (Clendenin, Kanawha County), "Windmill," 1920 (Vol. 1), 1920 (2 copies), 1922, 1924 (2 copies), 1925, 1926, 1929, 1930 (2 copies) (See Clendenin High School for later volumes)

Bishop Donahue High School (McMechen, Marshall County), "Veritas," 1964, 1970 (Vol.XII), 1971

Bluefield High School (Mercer County), "The Beaver," - see Beaver High School

Bluefield College (Virginia), "Rambler," 1938

Bluefield Colored Institute (Mercer County), "Senior Annual," 1919

Bluefield State College, (Mercer County), "The Bluefieldian," 1937 "The Golden Torch," 1950 "Diablos Azules," 1965, 1967, 1968 "Blueprint," 1970, 1971 (2 copies), 1974, 1977, 2001

Bramwell High School (Mercer County), "The Pinnacle," 1956, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972

Braxton County High School (Sutton, Braxton County), "The Eagle," 1971, 1974, 1977, 1981, 1981 (c.2), 2004, 2005

Bridgeport High School (Harrison County), "The Vista," 1927 (Vol. I) "Ki-Cu-Wa," 1942, 1946, 1952, 1969, 1970, 1975, 1976, 1978 (Vol.37)

Bristol High School (Harrison County), "Bison," 1954, 1956, 1967, 60 Years of Memories, 1913-1973

Broaddus College, (Philippi, Barbour County), "Battler," 1927, 1928, 1928 (c.2).

Broaddus Institute (Philippi, Barbour County), 1916 (vol. 1), 1917 (vol. 2).

Brooke High School (Wellsburg, Brooke County), "Crossroads," 1974 Brown's Creek District High School (Kimball, McDowell County), "Onelie Skule Daze," 1925

Buckhannon-Upshur High School, (Upshur County), "The Rhododrendron," 1922 (Vol. I), 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1926 (c.2), 1927, 1928, 1929 "Buckongehanon," 1949 (Vol. I) (first yearbook since 1930), 1952, 1954, 1955, 1959, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1970, 2000.

Buffalo High School (Kenova, Wayne County), "Memoriae," 1946 (Vol. IV) "The Bison," 1969, 1974, 1976, 1978

Bunker Hill High School (Berkeley County), "Memories," 1927 (Vol.I)

Burnsville High School (Braxton County), "Onimgohow," *1935, 1959

Burnsville Grade School (Braxton County), 1970, 1976, 1977, 1978-79, 1983-84, 1984-85, 1992, 1994-95, 1996-97 (all photocopies)

Cabell Midland High School (Ona, Cabell County), "Excalibur," 1996, 1996 (c.2), 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016

Cabin Creek District High School, (Kanawha County), "Kanawhan," 1921, 1923 (Vol. VII), 1926, 1930, 1931 (2 copies), 1932

Cairo High School (Ritchie County), "Pharaoh," 1969

Calhoun County High School (Grantsville), "The Calhounian," 1930 (Vol. I), 1931, 1939 (Vol. III), 1940, 1941, 1945-1946 (Vol. VI), 1946-1947, 1951, 1952, 1952 (c. 2), 1955, 1958, 1983, 1984, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1996

Calvary Baptist Academy (Putnam County), 2000

Camden-Clark Memorial Hospital School of Nursing (Parkersburg, Wood County), "Starch and Stripes," 1959

Cameron High School (Marshall County), "The Hilltop," 1921 (Vol. 1).

Cammack Junior H. S. (Huntington, Cabell County), 1971

Camp Shaw-Mi-Del-Eca (Greenbrier Military School's Four Tribe Camp), 1942

Capital High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "The Blue Book," 1990, 1992, 1995.

Capon Bridge Junior High School (Hampshire County), 1968, 1975-76

Carroll District High School (Hamlin, Lincoln County, appears to become Hamlin High), "Llorrac," 1924 (vol. 1, 3 copies), 1925 (3 copies contains "Educational History of Lincoln County," by F. B. Lambert) 1926 (2 copies), 1928 (2 copies)

Cedar Grove Community School (Kanawha County), 1985

Cedar Grove High School, (Kanawha County), "Trails," 1957 (2 copies), 1958 (2 copies), 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962 (2 copies), 1963 (2 copies), 1964 (2 copies), 1965, 1966 (3 copies), 1966, 1967 (3 copies), 1968, 1969 (2 copies), 1970

Central Catholic High School (Wheeling, Ohio County), "Stella Marist," 1954 "Stella Maris," 1962, 1963 "Accolade," 1965, 1966, 1967, 1970.

Central Preston High School (Kingwood, Preston County), 1990, 1991 (final issue)

Ceredo-Kenova High School (Wayne County), "Heraldus," 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1942, 1947, 1954, 1965, 1970

Chapmanville High School (Logan County), "Tiger," 1993

Charleston High School, (Kanawha County), "The Bookstrap," 1919, 1920. "The Charlestonian," 1909 (Volume 1), 1910 (3 copies), 1910, 1911, (c.2), 1912 (2 copies), 1913 (3 copies), 1914 (2 copies), 1915, 1915, 1917, 1921, 1922 (2 copies), 1922 (2 copies), 1923 (3 copies), 1924, 1924 (3 copies), 1925, January 1925, 1925 (2 copies), 1926, 1926 (2 copies), 1927, 1927 (2 copies), 1928, 1928, 1929, 1929 (5 copies), 1930, 1930 (3 copies), 1931, 1931 (3 copies), 1932, 1932 (2 copies), 1933, 1933 (3 copies), 1935 (3 copies), 1936, 1936 (2 copies), 1937 (2 copies), 1938, 1938 (3 copies), 1939, 1939 (2 copies), 1940 (2 copies), 1941, 1941 (3 copies), 1942, 1942 (2 copies), 1943, 1944, 1945, 1945 (c.2), 1946, 1946, 1947, 1947 (5 copies), 1948, 1948 (c.2), 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, , 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962 (2 copies), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989 (last issue).
"Portfolio," Spring 1946

Charleston Catholic High School (Kanawha County), "Shamrock," 1957, 1965 "Irish Rover," 1971, 1990, "Fighting Irish," 1995, 1996, 1999 "The Irish," 2002 "Initial Reaction," 1993

Charles Town High School (Jefferson County), "The Rambler," 1926 (Vol. VII), 1927, 1930, 1931, 1941, 1954, 1956, 1961, 1962

Chattaroy High School (Mingo County), "Yellow Jacket," 1957

Chester High School (Hancock County), "The Polaris," 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1961, 1963

Circleville High School (Pendleton County), "Indio," , 1985, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998 (last issue).

Clay County High School (Clay County), "Tiskelwah," 1959, 1967, 1987, 1988 (Vol.47), 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000
Catalog, 1914-1915

Clay District High School (Shinnston, Harrison County), "The Courier," 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1931, 1937

Clear Fork High School (Colcord, Raleigh County), "Panther Pride," 1986
"Panther Challenge," 1979, "Panther Cry," 1981, "Odyssey," 1982

Clendenin Elementary (Kanawha County), 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, "Cardinal Communications" 1987, 1988, 1989

Clendenin High School (Kanawha County), "The Mountain Echo," 1943 (2 copies), 1946, "Clenecho," 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1963 (see Big Sandy District High School for earlier volumes) Senior Pictorial, 1944 50th Reunion Class of 1945 Echoes of Clendenin, 1912-1963 (3 copies) Reunion 1997

Coalton High School (Randolph County), "The Mountaineer," 1947, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1967

Collins High School (Oak Hill, Fayette County), "The Acorn," - see Oak Hill High School

Concord State Normal School, (Athens, Mercer County), "Rhododrendron," 1913 Concord College (Athens, Mercer County), "Concord Echoes," 1915 (Vol. I) "Pine Tree," 1934, 1934 (c.2), 1935 (2 copies), 1936, 1948, 1950, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1963 (c.2), 1964, 1964 (c.2), 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (c.2), 1974, 1974 (c.2), 1977, 1978, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1991

Cowen High School, (Webster, County), "Bulldog Barx," 1967

Crichton High School (Quinwood, Greenbrier County) "Wildcat," 1962

Cross Lanes Christian (Kanawha County), "Centurian," 1985

Crum High School (Wayne County), "Mountaineer," 1951 (Vol. I), 1953, 1954, 1962, 1963, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1978 (2 copies), 1979, 1980, 1980 (c. 2), 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987

Davis & Elkins College (Elkins, Randolph County), "The Phoenix," 1922 "The Senator," 1923, 1925, 1925 (c.2) "The Nautilus," 1926, (Vol. 1) "Senatus,"1940, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958 (2 copies), 1960, 1961, 1963, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1975, 1978, 1989-1990

DeSales Heights Academy of the Visitation, (Parkersburg, Wood County), "Heights Lights," 1979

Doddridge County High School (West Union), "The Bulldog," 1971, 1973, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003.

Dorothy Elementary (Dorothy, Raleigh County), 1954

DuBois High School (Mount Hope, Fayette County), "The Echo," 1937

Dunbar High School (Kanawha County), "The Bulldog," 1944, "The Link," 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949 "The Bulldog," 1959, 1960, 1961 (two copies), 1962, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1989, Reunion book 1999

Dunbar Junior High School (Kanawha County), "Bullpup," 1963, 1985, 1986-87

DuPont High School (Belle, Kanawha County), "The DuPontian," 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1955, 1974, 1975, 1987, 1988.

DuPont Middle (Belle, Kanawha County), 2001, 2006

Duval High School (Griffithsville, Lincoln County), "Ace," 1925, "Orange and Black," 1926, 1929, 1947, 1948, 1948 (c.2), 1949, 1949 (c.2), 1951 "Yellowjacket," 1952, 1955, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 2000 (2 copies), 2001 (2 copies), 2002 (2 copies), 2003 (2 copies), 2005

East Bank High School, (Kanawha County), "Kanawhan," 1938, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1955, 1964, 1965, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982 (2 copies), 1983, 1984, 1993

East Bank Middle School, (Kanawha County), "Mountaineer Echoes," 1977-1978 (Vol. 3) (3 copies), 1979 (2 copies), 1980, 1981, 1983 (3 copies), 1985 (3 copies), 1987 (3 copies), 1999-2000, 2000, 2001-2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006-2007 (2 copies), 2008 (3 copies)

East Fairmont High School (Marion County), "Orion," 1922 (Vol. I), 1923, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1937, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1958, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1994 (known as East Side High School prior to 1925)

East Hardy High School (Baker, Hardy County), "Concolor," 1981, 1982, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010

East Preston High School (Preston County), "East Prestonian," 1979, 1980, 1982

East River High School (Princeton, Mercer County), "The Cliffs," 1917 (Vol. I)

East Side High School (Fairmont, Marion County) - see East Fairmont High School

Eastern Greenbrier Junior High School, (Ronceverte, Greenbrier County), 1992-1993, 1994

Edray District High School, (Marlinton, Pocahontas County), "Seneca," 1925, 1926 (Vol. II), 1928 "Marlintonian," 1930 (Vol. 1)

Elizabeth High School, (Wirt County), "The Elizabethan," 1926 (Vol.III), 1926 (c.2)

Elk District High School (Elkview, Kanawha County), "The Antler," 1925 (Vol. 1), 1925 (c.2), 1926, 1927, 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1940
Elkview High School, "Antler," 1943, 1957

Elk Garden High School, (Mineral County), "Wapiti," 1975

Elkhorn High School, (McDowell County), "The Flying Fifty," 1950 (Photocopy)

Elkins First Ward School (Randolph COunty), 1983, 1984
Elkins High School (Randolph County), "The Tiger," 1916, 1917 (2 copies), 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, "The Little Tiger," 1927, "The Tiger,"1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1958, 1959.

Elkview High School, (Kanawha County) - see Elk District High School

Elkview Junior High School (Kanawha County), "The Antler," 1973-74 (2 copies), 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979
Elkview Middle School (Kanawha County), "The Antler," 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2003, 2004

Fairmont High School (Marion County), "Maple Leaves," 1910, 1916, 1916, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1970, 1980, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1999.

Fairmont State Normal School, (Marion County), "The Mound," 1908, 1909 (Vol. II), 1910, 1913, 1914, 1916, 1917, 1918 "Bulletin-Mound," 1919, "The Mound," 1921.

Fairmont State Teacher's College, (Marion County), "The Mound," 1927, 1928 (three copies), 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1935, 1936.

Fairmont State College, (Marion County), "The Mound," 1937, 1938 (two copies), 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1949, 1950 (2 copies), 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964 (2 copies), 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981 (two copies), 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1996, 2006

Fairview High School, (Marion County), "The Paw Paw," 1914 (Vol. I), 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1925, 1928, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954

Farmington High School (Marion County), "Lincolneer," 1919 (Vol. I), 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1944, 1945, 1947-1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1961, 1965.

Fayetteville High School (Fayette County), "Pirate Treasure Chest," 1952, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1973

Fayetteville Middle School (Fayette County), 1983, 1985

Fellowsville High School (Preston County), "Memories," 1953, 1954, 1959, 1960, 1968

Flemington High School (Taylor County), "Memoirs," 1958, 1984 (Vol. 54), 1985, 1988 "By Gone Reflections," 1930-1990

Follansbee High School (Brooke County), "The Forge," 1946 (Vol. I), 1962, 1963, 1964

Fort Ashby High School, (Mineral County), "Fortress," 1947, 1949, 1952, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1970, 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (2 copies), 1974 (2 copies), 1975

Frankfort High School (Short Gap, Mineral County), "Talon," 1977 (Vol. I), 1978, 1993

Frankfort Middle School (Ridgely, Mineral County), "The Crest," 1993 (Vol. 1), 1995

Franklin High School (Pendleton County), "Panther," 1976 (Vol. XXIII), 1978, 1980, 1980 (c. 2), 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998 (last issue)

Gap Mills High School (Monroe County), "Mill Wheel," 1960, 1961

Garnet High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), 1900-1956, "The Way We Were." (a retrospective)

Gary High School, (McDowell County), "The Coaldigger," 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1962, 1968

Gassaway High School (Braxton County), "The Elk," 1959, 1960, 1962.

Gauley Bridge High School (Fayette County), "The Gauneka," 1927 (Vol. I), 1928, 1939 (newspaper pictures), 1952, 1979, 1980, 1981

George Washington High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "Patriot," 1965 (Vol. I), 1968, 1971, 1972

Gilbert High School (Mingo County), "The Roaring Lion," 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1987 Reunion Books, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010

Gilmer County School (Glenville, Gilmer County), "Gilmaurora," 1971, 1972, 1973 (3 copies), 1974

Gilmore High School (Sandyville, Jackson County), "The Pirate," 1958, 1960, 1961

Glen Rogers High School, (Wyoming County), "The Owl," 1956, 1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982.

Glade District High School (Cowen, Webster County), "Gladihisra," 1925, 1927.

Glenville State College, (Gilmer County), "Kanawhachen," 1911 (Vol. I), 1911 (c.2), 1914 (Vol. II), 1916, 1922, 1924 (3 copies), 1926 (2 copies), 1929, 1937, 1942, 1953, 1958, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (c.2), 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1975 (c.2), 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990 (2 copies), 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998 (2 copies), 1999, 2000, 2000-2004.

Grafton High School, (Taylor County), "The Brooklet," 1909, 1911, "Vox Discipuli," 1912, 1914-15 "The Mountaineer," 1920 (Vol. I) "Re-Echo," 1961, 1973, 1974, 1975

Grant District High School, (Cairo, Ritchie County), 1925

Green Bank High School (Pocahontas), "Mountain Breezes," 1924 (Vol. II), 1968, 1969, 1970

Green District High School (Reader, Wetzel County), Annual 1917 v. 1

Greenbrier College (Lewisburg, Greenbrier County), "Follies," 1925, "Saga," 1927 (two copies), 1929, 1937, 1940, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1962, 1972

Greenbrier Military School, (Lewisburg, Greenbrier County), "The Trooper," 1922 (Vol. I.) "The Brier Patch," 1923 (Vol. I.), 1924, 1925, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1937, 1937 (c.2), 1938, 1938 (c.2), 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1945 (c.2), 1946, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1963
Greenbrier Military School Catalogue, 1912-1913, 1913-1914, 1914-1915, 1919-1920, 1920-1921, 1921-1922, 1922-1923, 1926-1927, 1928-1929, 1934-1935, 1936-1937 (2 copies), 1937-1938 Summary of Annual Catalogue, 1926-1927

Greenbrier West High School (Charmco, Greenbrier County), "The Cavalier," 1969, 1970, 1970 (c.2), 1980

Greenville High School (Monroe County), "The Milestone," 1954

Guyan Valley High School (Branchland, Lincoln County), "The Gee Vee," 1938, "School Daze," 1949 "Wildcat," 1955

Hamilton Junior High School, (Parkersburg, Wood County), "The Hamiltonian," 1971

Hamlin High School, (Lincoln County), "Pied Piper," May 1937, 1937 (c.2), 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1951 (c.2), 1951 (c.3), 1952, 1952 (c.2), 1952 (c.3), 1953, 1954, 1954 (c.2), 1955, 1955 (c.2), 1956 (2 copies), 1956 (c.3), 1957 (2 copies), 1958, 1959 (3 copies), 1960, 1961, 1961 (c.2), 1962, 1962 (c.2), 1963 (3 copies), 1963 (c.4), 1964, 1965 (2 copies), 1965 (c.3), 1966, 1966 (c.2), 1967 (3 copies), 1967 (c.4), 1968, 1968 (c.2), 1969, 1970 (2 copies), 1970 (c.3), 1971, 1971 (c.2), 1972 (2 copies), 1973 (3 copies), 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1976, 1977, 1988

Hampshire High School, (Romney, Hampshire County), "The Trojan," 1965 (Vol. I) 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1988, 1994, 1996, 1998, 2004, 2005 (2 copies), 2006, 2008 (2 copies), 2009 (2 copies), 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

Harman High School, (Randolph County), "Panther," 1955, 1967, 1969, 1977

Harpers Ferry High School, (Jefferson County), "Ferry Tales," 1963, 1964

Harrisville High School (Ritchie County), "Mountain Echoes," 1927

Hedgesville High School (Berkeley County), "Eagle," 1950, 1952, 1954, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1992

Herbert Hoover High School (Clendenin, Kanawha County), "President," 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1975, 1976

Hillsboro High School (Pocahontas County) "The Echo," 1923, 1924 "Red Devil," 1952, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1970

Hinton High School (Summers County), "The Dart," 1922, 1924, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1966, 1967

Horace Mann Junior High School (Kanawha County), Yearbook, 1978, 1978, 1979, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982 (2 copies), 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989

Hundred High School (Wetzel County), "Centurion," 1954, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1961

Huntington H. S. (Cabell County), "The High School Annual"1915 (Vol.2, reprint), 1916, "The Tatler," 1920 (Vol.7), 1923, 1925, 1926, 1927 "The Huntingtonian," 1928 (Vol. I), 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1957 (c.2), 1960, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1984 "Capstone," 1997 (v.1), 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2010, 2011

Huntington East High School (Cabell County), "East Hi," 1942 (Vol. II), 1946, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1961, 1962 "Highlander," 1963, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1976, 1982, 1983, 1984

Hurricane High School (Putnam County), "The Hurricane," 1938, 1941 "The Redskin," 1957, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1973, 1996

Iaeger High School (McDowell County), "The Mountaineer," 1926 "The Pilot," May 1930, April 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1963, 1972

Independence High School (Coal City, Raleigh County), "Patriot Spirit," 1987 (Vol. XI)

James Monroe High School (Lindside, Monroe County), "Stampede," 2000 (Vol. 6)

Jane Lew High School (Lewis County), "The Lewisite," 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942

Jefferson High School (Jefferson County), "Reflections," 1974, 1976

John Marshall High School (Glen Dale, Marshall County), "Pride," 1976 (Vol. VIII), 1978, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2007

Keyser High School (Mineral County), "Black and Gold," 1922, "Keyhisco," 1930, 1936, 1946, 1949, 1951, 1953, 1955

Kingston High School (Fayette County) "The Mountaineer Echo," (Vol. I) 1941

Lenore High School (Mingo County), "Lenorian," 1960 "The Ranger," 1964

Lewis County High School (Lewis County), "Collicola," 1985

Lewisburg High School (Greenbrier County), "The Senator," 1950, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1968 (final issue) Senior Souvenir Album 1962 Memories from "The School on the Hill" 1924-1968 Reunion 1993

Lewisburg Seminary, (Greenbrier County), "Record," Vol. 3, No.1, 1918-1919 (Student List-no pics), "Follies," 1920, 1922
"The Greenbrier," 1907

Liberty High School (Glen Daniel, Raleigh County), "Legacy," 1983, 1985, 2000

Lincoln High School (Shinnston, Harrison County), "Cougar Tracks," 1979 (two copies), 1980, 1991

Lincoln Junior High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "The Searchlight," 1937, January 1938, May 1938

Linsly Military Institute (Wheeling, Ohio County), "At Ease," 1953, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1966, Alumni Directory, c1976, 1979 "The Aviator," 1983 "Linsly," 1989

Logan High School (Logan County), "Guyana," 1923 (Vol.I), , 1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1930, 1939, 1944, 1951, 1952, 1957, 1957 (c.2), 1959, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967.

Logan High School (Logan County), Senior Souvenir, 1935

Lost Creek High School, (Harrison County), "Memories," 1921, 1927, 1950, 1965 (last issue)

Lumberport High School (Harrison County), "The Eagle," 1947 (two copies), 1950, 1958, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1967, 1968, 1969

Madonna High School (Weirton, Hancock County), "The Madonnian," 1961 (Vol. III)

Magnolia High School (New Martinsville, Wetzel County), "The Magnolia," 1914, May 1916, 1919, 1920, 1922 (2 copies), 1924 (Vol. XIV), 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931 "The Magnolian," 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940 (2 copies), 1942, 1944, 1944, 1947, 1948, 1959, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979

Man High School (Logan County), "The Hillbilly," 1950, 1951, 1952, 1956 "Echo," 1958, 1969, 1987

Mannington High School (Marion County), "The Mirabile," 1909, 1917, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977.

Marlinton High School, (Pocahontas County), "Nautilus," 1934, "Marlintonian," 1947, 1948, 1966

Marmet Junior High School (Kanawha County), "Mustangs," 1968, 1969-1970, 1971-1972, 1979, 1985, 1986, 1989

Marshfork High School, (Montcoal, Raleigh County), "The Kennel," 1953, 1986, 1989

Marshall College/University (Huntington, Cabell County), "Mirabilia," 1910, 1911, 1913, 1913 (c.2), 1916, 1917, 1918, 1921, 1924, 1924 (c.2), 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1930, 1930 (c.2), 1931, "Chief Justice, "1940 (Vol. I), 1940 (c.2), 1941, 1946, 1948, 1948 (c.2), 1949, 1950, 1951, 1951 (c. 2), 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1960 (c.2), 1961, 1962, 1962 (c.2), 1963, 1963 (c.2), 1964, 1965, 1965 (c.2), 1966, 1967, 1968, 1968 (c.2), 1969, 1969 (c.2), 1970, 1971, 1971 (c.2), 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1986 (2 copies), 1987, 1987 (2 copies), 1988, 1988, 1989, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1992 (c.2), 1993, 1993 (c.2), 1994 (2 copies) Freshman Register, 1978

Marshall High School (Huntington, Cabell County), "The Echo," 1949 "Brigadier," 1951, 1954, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960.

Martinsburg High School (Berkeley County), "The Triangle," 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1922, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, "The Orange & Black," 1936, 1937 "The Triangle," 1941, 1947, 1949, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1967, 1969.

Masontown High School (Preston County), "The Laurel," 1928, "The Echo," 1954

Mathias School (Hardy County), "Mahigan," 1969, 1973, 1975 (2 copies, c.2), 1979

Matoaka High School (Mercer County), "The Alethian," 1928 (Vol. 1) "Wahoo," 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1975, 1977

McKinley Junior High School (St. Albans, Kanawha County), 1st annual May Festival 1964

McKinley Vocational High School (Wheeling, Ohio County) "The Craftsman," 1953, 1954, 1964, 1965, 1966

Meadow Bridge High School (Fayette County), "The Monte' Meade," 1957, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989

Mid-America Christian School (Huntington, Cabell County), "Shadows," 1979 (Vol.II)

Milton High School, (Cabell County),Grant District High School, "The Grantonian," 1930 "The Miltonian," 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939 (two copies), 1940, 1941, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1953 (c.2), 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1963, 1963 (c.2), 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1970 (c.2), 1971, 1971 (c.2), 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (c.2), 1975, 1975 (c.2), 1976, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1993 (c.2), 1994

Miss Adams' School, (Charleston, Kanawha County), 1905, 1906

Monongah High School, (Marion County), "Black Diamond," 1922 (Vol. II), 1938, 1941, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978

Montcalm High School (Mercer County), "The General," 1959

Montgomery High School (Fayette County), "The Chien Gris," 1940, 1940 (c.2), 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1964, 1968.

Montgomery Preparatory (Fayette County), "The Spectator," 1914 (Volume 1)

Moorefield High School, (Hardy County), "The Yellowjacket," 1940 (Vol. II), 1941, 1957, 1959, 1961, 2001, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010

Morgantown High School, (Monongalia County), "Memories," 1919, 1919 (c.2), 1921, 1922, 1922 (c.2), 1923, 1925 "Retrospectus," 1927 "Mohigan," 1928 (Vol.I), 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1941, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1949, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973.

Morgantown Junior High School, (Monongalia County), "The Dragon," 1968, 1969, 1970

Morris Harvey College (Charleston, Kanawha County), "The Harveyan," 1923, 1923 (c.2), 1924, 1924 (c.2), 1925, 1926, 1927, 1927 (c.2), 1928, 1928 (c.2), 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1930, 1931, 1931 (c.2), 1932, 1933, 1933 (c.2), 1934, 1934 (c.2), 1935, 1935 (c.2), 1938, 1938 (c.2), 1939, 1939 (2 copies), 1941, 1941 (2 copies), 1942, 1942 (2 copies), 1945, 1945 (c.2), 1946, 1946 (2 copies), 1947, 1947 (2 copies), 1948, 1948 (3 copies), 1949, 1949 (c.2), 1950, 1950 (c.2), 1951, 1951 (2 copies), 1952, 1952 (3 copies), 1953, 1953 (3 copies), 1954, 1954 (c. 2), 1955, 1955 (c. 2), 1956 (2 copies), 1957, 1957 (c.2), 1958, 1958 (c.2),1959, 1959 (3 copies), 1960, 1960 (4 copies), 1961, 1961 (4 copies), 1962, 1962 (3 copies, 1963, 1964, 1964 (2 copies), 1965, 1965 (2 copies), 1966, 1966 (c.2), 1967, 1967 (4 copies), 1968, 1968 (2 copies), 1969 (4 copies), 1970, 1970 (3 copies), 1971, 1971 (2 copies), 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (2 copies), 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1975 (2 copies), 1976, 1976 (c.2), 1977, 1977 (c.2)
University of Charleston, unnamed, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981 (2 copies) "The Phoenix," 1983 (2 copies), 1984 (2 copies), 1986, 1986 (c.2), 1988 (3 copies), 1989, 1990,1991, 1992, 1993 "Talon," 1994 (80th Anniversary retrospective), 1994

Moundsville High School (Marshall County), "The Orospolitan," June 1914, Feb., Mar., June,1916, May 1917, May 1918, 1919, 1922, 1924, 1925, 1925 (c.2), 1926, 1926 (c.2), 1927, 1927 (c.2), 1928 (2 copies), 1928 (c.3), 1929, 1931, 1932, 1935, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946 (3 copies), 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955 (2 copies), 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961 (2 copies), 1962 (2 copies), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967

Mount de Chantal Visitation Academy (Wheeling, Ohio County), "The Mount," 1914/15, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1923 (2 copies), 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1934, 1935, 1935 (2 copies), 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958 , 1959, 1972/72, 1973/74, 1978, 1979, 1982/1983 (2 copies), 1984, 1985, 1986.1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 "Onyx," 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008 (last issue)

Mount Hope High School (Fayette County), "Mons Spei," 1919 (Vol. I), 1924 (Vol. 2), 1928, 1962, 1963, 1996

Mountain State College, (Parkersburg, Wood County), "Mounstacoan," 1951, 1952, 1953.

Mullens High School (Wyoming County), "The Rebel," 1955, 1964

Musselman High School, (Inwood, Berkeley County), "The Memory Jub," 1950" "The Echo," 1951, 1952, 1953, 1959, 1960, 1960 (c. 2), 1961, 1961 (c. 2), 1962, 1962 (c. 2), 1963, 1963 (c. 2), 1964, 1964 (c. 2), 1965, 1965 (c. 2), 1966, 1960 (c. 2), 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 2005

New Cumberland High School (Hancock County), "The Pebble," 1961

New River State School, (Montgomery, Fayette County), "Ahwanak," 1921, 1922, 1923 (Vol. III), 1924, 1930, 1930 (c.2)

Newell High School (Hancock County), 1923

Nicholas County High School, (Summersville), "Nichlosean," 1916, 1923, 1923, 1925 (Vol. 6), 1938, 1938, 1947, 1950, 1952, 1956, 1961, 1965, 1966, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1989, 1994, 2001 "Thirty Years of Our Lives 1948-1978"

Nitro High School (Kanawha County), "The Spy Glass," 1940, "Powder Keg," 1942, 1942 (c. 2), 1943, 1944, 1945 "The Wildcat," 1947, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1973, 1974, 1975 "Nitronian," 1983, 1984 (3 copies), 1985 (2 copies), 1987, 1988, 1989 Memories, Class of 1954 (post-1989)

Normantown High School (Gilmer County), "Viking Review," 1937, "Viking Re-Vue," 1940

North Berkeley Elementary School (Morgan County), 1977, 1978, 1979

Northfork District Schools (McDowell County), 1921

Northfork High School, (McDowell County), "Hi-Lights," 1940, 1942 (Vol. VI) (two copies), 1947

Northfork-Elkhorn High School (Northfork, McDowell County), "Blue Demon," 1954, 1955, 1956, 1964, 1965, 1966

North Marion High School, (Farmington, Marion County), "North Star," 1992, 1998 (Vol.19), 1999

Notre Dame High School (Clarksburg, Harrison County), "Leprachaun," 1956, 1957, 1958, 1963, 1964, 1965 (no name), 1982

Nuttall High School (Lookout, Fayette, County), "Nutshell," 1957, 1958

Oak Hill High School (Fayette County), "The Acorn," 1924, 1925, 1926, 1980
(Collins High School from 1950-1977) Collins High School (Oak Hill, Fayette County), "The Acorn," 1953, 1962, 1963, 1964

Ohio Valley College (Parkersburg, Wood County), "Vallerian," 1968, 1969, 1972, 1982

Ohio Valley General Hospital School of Nursing, (Wheeling, Ohio County), "Cap 'n bib," 1961 "The Nutrix," 1974, 1977

Paden City High School, (Wetzel County), "The Green and White," 1966, 2003

Parkersburg High School, (Wood County), "The Pilgrim," 1914 (class list 1916) "The Quill," March, April, & May 1919, January 1920, January 1921, June 1921, January 1922, June 1922, January 1923, June 1923, Feb.1924, June 1924, January 1925, May 1925, "The Parhischan," 1926, 1927, 1927 (c.2), 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1932 (c.2), 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938 (available on Mi21-2, Reading Room cabinet), 1939, 1940, 1941 (available on Mi21-2, Reading Room cabinet), 1942, 1943, 1944, 1944 (c. 2), 1945, 1945 (c. 2), 1946, 1947, 1947 (c. 2), 1948, 1948 (2 copies), 1949, 1949 (4 copies), 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1956 (c.2), 1957, 1958, 1958 (c.2), 1959, 1959 (c.2), 1960, 1960 (c.2), 1961, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1970, "A Classic Example," 1986, 1994

Parkersburg Catholic High School (Wood County), "Omnibus Omnia," 1956, 1958 1966, "Crusader," 1984

Parkersburg South High School, (Wood County), "Patrian," 1969, 1970, 1980.

Parsons High School, (Tucker County), "The Black Arrow," 1927 (Vol. I) (two copies), 1928 1940 (class picture) "The Sylvanian, III," 1949 "The Panther," 1959

Paw Paw High School (Morgan County), "Papahisco," 1984, 1989

Pax High School (Fayette County), "The Wildcat," 1954 (1st since 1941).

Pendleton County High School (Pendleton County), "Wildcat," 1999 (Vol. 1), 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010

Pendleton County M.S. (Pendleton County), 2010 (Vol. 1)

Pennsboro High School (Ritchie County), "Cardinal," 1968 (Vol.38),1985

Petersburg High School (Grant County), "The Petro-Schola," 1959 (Vol. 14), 1961, 1969, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009

Peterstown High School (Monroe County), "The Treasure Chest," 1940, 1947, 1957, 1971, 1979

Philippi High School (Barbour County), "Golden Days," 1929 (two copies)

Philip Barbour High School, (Philippi), "Equestrian," 1965, 1966, 1967, 1995 (Vol.32)

Pickens High School (Randolph County), "Panther," 1972, 1986.

Piedmont High School (Mineral County), "Tris," 1921 (Vol.6), 1923, 1924, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932.

Pine Grove High School (Wetzel County), "Whispering Pines," 1922 "Blue and Gold", 1947

Pineville High School (Wyoming County), "The Minutemen," 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1956, 1966

Pleasants County M. S. (Belmont, Pleasants County), "Minutemen," 1988, 1989

Poca High School, (Kanawha County), "Pocatalico," 1929, 1956, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1978

Pocahontas County High School (Dunmore, Pocahontas County), "The Warrior," 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1990, 1993, 1996 (Vol. 26)

Point Pleasant High School, (Mason County), "The Oh-Kan," 1925, 1925 (c. 2), 1927, 1928, 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1931, 1935, 1935 (c.2), 1936, 1937, 1937 (c.2), 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1942 (c.2), 1943, 1944, 1945, 1950, 1952, 1953

Potomac State College (Keyser, Mineral County), Preparatory Branch, "The Herald," 1921 (Vol. I) "The Potowmak," 1927 (Vol. I), "Bulletin," 1932-33 "The Catamount," 1939 (Vol. 1), 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1961, 1961 (c.2), 1962, 1962 (c.2), 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971-72, 1972-73 1973, 1974, 1975.

Powatan College, (Charles Town, Jefferson County), "War Whoop," 1905 (Catalogue), 1912

Pratt Junior H. S. (Kanawha County), 1967, 1968

Preston High School (Kingwood), "Legasy," 1992 (Vol. I)

Princeton High School, (Mercer County), "The Cliffs,"1925 (Vol. II), 1945 "The Tiger," 1952, 1957 "The Tiger Legend," 1968

Rainelle High School (Greenbrier County), "Adytum Memoriae," 1939 (Vol.I), 1940, 1941 "The Ranger," 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1958 (c.2), 1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1965 (c.2), 1966, 1966 (c.2), 1967, 1967 (c.2), 1968, 1968 (c.2) Rainelle Schools, 1981-1982 (elementary though ninth grade)

Rainelle High School Reunion, First Reunion, 1925-1968 (1992) Second Multi-Class Reunion, 1925-1968 (1997) Third Multi-Class Reunion, 1925-1968 (2002) Fourth All School Reunion, 1925-1968 (2007)

Ravenswood High School (Jackson County), "The Nautilus," 1921 (Vol.I), 1922, 1925, 1952, 1953, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1985

Reader High School (Wetzel County), "The Read-er," 1938

Richwood High School, (Nicholas County), "The Mnemosyne," 1926, 1926 (c.2), 1927 (2 copies), 1928 "Woodsman," 1940 "The Lumberjack," 1952, 1954, 1955

Ridgeley High School (Mineral County), "The Ridgeleyette," 1942, 1949, 1973

Ripley High School, (Jackson County), "The Pioneer," 1925, 1925 (c.2), 1926, 1927 "The Viking," 1938, 1939, 1984, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Ritchie County High School (Harrisville), "Rhapsody," 1987 (Vol.I)

Rivesville High School (Marion County), "Campus Shadows," 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980

Roane County High School (Roane County), "Accolade," 1998
1994 (Vol. 1)

Romney High School, (Hampshire County), "Pioneer," 1955 (Vol.1), 1956, 1963, 1964

Roosevelt-Wilson High School (Nutter Fort, Harrison County) "The Echo," 1928 (Vol.II), 1930 The Comecho," 1942, 1950, 1952 "The Teddy Bear," 1961 "Prexie," 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971

Roosevelt Junior High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "Roughrider," 1984, 1985, 1986, 1989, 2000

Rowlesburg H.S, (Preston County), "Cheatonian," 1988 (Vol. 42), (last issue)

Rupert High School, (Greenbrier County), "The Crimson Tide," 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1963, 1963 (c.2), 1964, 1967, 1968 senior memories book for Paul Cohenour, 1967

Sacred Heart Grade School, (Charleston, Kanawha County) "Bulldogs," 2009

St. Albans High School (Kanawha County), "Simmerings," 1933, "Dragonian," 1939, 1941 (Vol. IV), 1945, 1946, 1948, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1970 (c.2), 1977, 1988

St. Albans Junior High School (Kanawha County), "The Eaglean," 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989

St. Anthony's High School, (Follansbee, Brooke County), "San Antonian," 1963

St. Frances School of Nursing, (Charleston Kanawha County), "Annual," 1952 (Vol.1).

St. Francis Central High School (Morgantown, Monongalia County), 1986

St. Hilda's Hall (Charles Town, Jefferson County), "Links," 1920, 1921, 1923

St. Joseph's Academy (Wheeling, Ohio County), "Memories," 1946,1947, 1955, 1957, 1959.

St. Joseph's Central Catholic High School, (Huntington, Cabell County), "The Blue and Gold," 1958, 1959, 1960 The Builder," 1980, 1981

St. Joseph's High School (Martinsburg, Berkeley County), "Crusader," 1969

St. Joseph's Hospital School of Nursing, (Parkersburg), "Annuals of St. Jo," 1948 "Sajonu," 1957, 1959

St. Joseph Parish School, (Martinsburg, Berkeley County), 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2017, 2019

St. Joseph's Seminary, (Vienna, Wood County), "The Thane," 1969, 1972, 1974

St. Mary's High School, (Clarksburg, Harrison County), "Perfectionist," 1954 "Vale," 1955 (last issue)

St. Mary's High School (Pleasants County), "The Pageant," April, 1910 (Vol. I, #5) "The Purple and Gold," 1914, 1915 (Vol. 2), 1917 (Vol. 3), 1922 (Vol. 5), 1925, 1926, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1943, 1949, 1950, 1954, 1955, 1961, 1965, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1995.

St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing (Huntington, Cabell County), "The Marionite," 1956 (3 copies)

St. Patrick's High School (Weston, Lewis County), "The Green and Gold," 1947, 1951, 1953, 1955

Salem College (Harrison County), "Fensterscheibe," 1917 (Vol. 1 - 2 copies), "Vindauga," 1922 (two copies) "Dirigo," 1923, 1924, 1924 (c.2), 1925, 1926, 1926 (c.2), 1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933 (two copies), 1934, 1936, 1937 (two copies), 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965 (2 copies), 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973 (two copies), 1974, 1975, 1978.

Salem High School (Harrison County), "Mountain Memories," 1918 "Galleon," 1928 (Vol. I), 1939, "The Cub," 1954, 1955, 1966, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973 (final issue)

Salt Lick District High School (Burnsville, Braxton, County) "Onimgohow," 1925

Sandstone High School (Summers County) "The Hornet," 1956

Scott High School (Madison, Boone County), "The Walhondean (Vol. 1)," 1935 (2 copies), Senior Handbook, 1936 "The Scottonian," 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1947, 1971.

Shady Spring High School (Beaver, Raleigh County), "The Spring," 1950, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1992, 1996, 1997, 2000

Shepherd College (Shepherdstown, Jefferson County), "The Cohongoroota," 1925 (Vol. 12), 1926, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1961, 1962, 1963 (2 copies), 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1967 (c.2), 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976

Sherman High School (Seth, Boone County), "The Walhondian," 1941, 1942, 1948, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1964, 1967, 1972, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1998 (c.2), 2005, 2006

Sherrard High School (Marshall County), "Sherconan," 1955, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961 "The Rambler," 1964

Sherrard Junior High School (Marshall County), "Horizons," 1978

Sherred Hall, (Charleston, Kanawha County), 1907

Shinnston High School (Harrison County), "The Spartan," 1940, 1946 (two copies), 1953, 1954, 1955, 1958, 1963, 1965

Sissonville High School (Kanawha County), "Sissonian," 1969, 1970, 1970, 1972

Sistersville High School, (Tyler County), "The Signal," 1924 (Vol.13), 1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1932, 1933, 1936

Smithfield High School, (Wetzel County), "Neemoskeesy," 1922 (2 copies), "Spirit of S.High School," 1949 "The Lion," 1951 "The Gold and Blue," 1953 "Memories of 54," 1954 "The Golden Mane," 1956

Sophia High School (Raleigh County), "The Hawk's Nest," 1946, 1947, 1952, 1953, 1967, 1973

South Charleston High School, (Kanawha County), "The Loudspeaker," 1928 (Vol.I), 1928 "Pentagon," 1930 "Memoirs," 1935 (Vol. 4), 1936, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1950, 1950 (2 copies), 1956, 1957, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1976, 1977

South Harrison High School (Lost Creek, Harrison County), "Talon," 1972, 1977.

Spanishburg High School (Mercer County), "Wildcat," 1973, 1979

Spencer High School (Roane County), "The Rupicola," 1915, 1922, 1924, 1925 (3 copies), 1926 (3 copies), 1927, 1928, 1929 (3 copies), 1930 (2 copies), 1931, 1931 (c. 2), 1933, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1943, 1944 (2 copies), 1945 (2 copies), 1946 (2 copies), 1947, 1948, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1976, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1993 Alumni Reunion, 2000, 2005

Spring Valley High School (Huntington, Wayne County), "Howler," 2000

Stoco High School (Coal City, Raleigh County) "The Wigwam," 1948, 1973 Independence H. S. (Coal City) 1980 (Vol.4)

Stonewall Jackson High School (Charleston, Kanawha County) "Jacksonian," 1941, 1941, 1942 (2 copies), 1943, 1943 (2 copies), 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 1956 (2 copies), 1957, 1957 (4 copies), 1958, 1958 (2 copies), 1959, 1960, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989

Stratton High School, (Beckley, Raleigh County) "The Bulldog," 1953.

Sutton High School, (Braxton County), "Tiskelwah," 1921

Terra Alta High School (Preston County), "The Rhododendron," 1912, 1916 "Altonian," 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977

Thomas High School (Tucker County), "Retrospector," 1926 (no pics) "The Altamont," 1949

Thomas Jefferson Junior High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "The Amateur Reporter," June 1926, October 1926, December 1926, April 1927, June 1930, February 1931, June 1931, January 1932, June 1932, January 1933, June 1933, January 1934, June 1934, June 1941, January 1942, May 1942, January and May 1943 (2 copies), May 1954, May 1955, May 1956

Tolsia High School, (Fort Gay, Wayne County), "Tolsia Pride," 1988 (Vol. 1), 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 2002

Trap Hill High School, (Surveyor, Raleigh County), "The Bannerette," 1931 (Vol. 1), "The Trapper," 1960

Triadelphia District High School (Mingo County), "The Hillbilly," 1930, 1930 (c. 2)

Triadelphia High School (Wheeling, Ohio County) "The Triadelphian," 1921, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1927 (c. 2), 1928, 1929, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, "The Triad," 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1965, 1967, 1970, 1972.

Tunnelton High School, (Preston County) "The Tunneltonian," 1961, 1962, 1963, 1975

Tygarts Valley High School (Mill Creek, Randolph County), "The Tygart," 1924 (Vol.I) "Bulldog," 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971

Tyler County, High School (Middlebourne), 1911-1912 (Catalogue), "The Echo," 1912, 1913, 1915, 1922

Tyler Consolidated High School (Sistersville), "Excalibur," 1996

Unidis High School, (Union District, West Milford, Harrison County), "The Mirror," 1924 (Vol. I), 1925, 1926 (two copies), "Trojan Herald," 1938, 1965 (last issue)

Union High School (Benwood, Marshall County) "The Messenger," 1926, 1932, 1945 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957

Union High School, (Union, Monroe County), "The Cornerstone," 1954, 1955, 1959

University High School (Morgantown), "The Little Monticola," 1999

University of Charleston (Kanawha County) - see Morris Harvey College

Valley High School (Smithers, Fayette County), "Chien Gris," 2001 (Vol. XXIV)

Valley High School (Masontown, Preston County), "Echo," 1965, 1970

Van High School (Boone County), "Vancourier," 1951, 1955 (Vol. VI), 1959, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1979, 1980

Victory High School (Adamston, (Clarksburg), Harrison County), "The Annual," 1923 (2 copies), 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, "Optic," 1941, 1943, 1944 (2 copies), 1945, 1954, 1964, 1969

Vinson High School (Huntington, Wayne County), "Vinsonian," 1946 (Vol. I), 1948, 1968, 1976, 1979, 1991

W. Ralph Widmyer Elementary School (Morgan County), 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983

Wahama High School (Mason County), "Wahaman," 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1991, 1992

Walkersville High School (Lewis County), "Walkilew," 1937 (Vol. I), 1949, 1951, 1955

Walton High School (Roane County), "The Waltonian," 1951, 1952, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969

Wardensville High School (Hardy County), 1979

Warwood High School (Wheeling, Ohio County), "The War Whoop," 1929, 1929 (c.2) "The Cauldron," 1930 "The Warrior," 1931, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1955, 1959, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968

Washington High School, (Charles Town, Jefferson County), "Memories," 2009 (v. 1), 2010

Washington High School, (Brounland, Kanawha County), "Washingtonian," 1964 (last issue)

Washington Junior High School (Parkersburg, Wood County), "Venture," 1972

Washington Irving High School (Clarksburg, Harrison County) "Reminiscences," 1916 (Vol. I), 1917, 1918, 1919 (two copies), 1920, 1921 (three copies), 1922 (two copies), 1923 (two copies), 1924 (two copies), 1925 (two copies), 1926 (three copies), 1927, 1928 (three copies), 1929 (two copies), 1930 (two copies), 1931 (three copies), 1932 1933 (two copies) "Memoirs," 1934 (two copies), 1937, 1938 (two copies), 1940, 1941, 1944, 1945, 1947, 1949, 1950 (two copies), 1951 (three copies), 1952, 1953 (two copies), 1954 (two copies), 1955 (two copies), 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1976, 1978

Wayne High School (Wayne County), "Pioneer," 1963, 1978, 1988

Wayne County High School (Wayne County), "The Nuntius," 1930

Webster County High School (Upperglade, Webster County), "Highlander," 1987, "Highlander Pride," 2000

Webster Springs High School (Webster County), "The Mountaineer," 1916-17, 1929

Weir High School (Weirton, Hancock County), "Onawa," 1927, 1929, 1930 "Weirite," 1940, 1946, 1955, 1957, 1966.

Welch High School (McDowell County), "The Black Diamond," 1926, 1927, "On The Hill," 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1967

Wells High School (Newell, Hancock County), "The Rhododendron," 1941, 1948

Wellsburg High School, (Brooke County), "High Times," 1937 "Welhischa," 1940, 1944, 1952, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965.

West Fairmont Senior High School, "Maple Leaves," 1942

West Liberty High School (Ohio County), "Liber-tee-an," 1936, 1938, 1963

West Liberty State Teacher's College, (Ohio County), "Manatoc," 1926 (Vol. 1) "The Trumpet," 1929, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1933, 1934, 1948 "Winding Road," 1957, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1968 (2 copies), 1969, 1969 (c.2)

West Virginia Conference Seminary (Buckhannon, Upshur County), "Murmurmontis,"1904 (vol.I), 1905

West Virginia Institute of Technology (Montgomery, Fayette County), "The Bear Tracks," 1951, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1966 (three copies), 1967 (two copies), 1968 (two copies), 1969, 1970 (three copies), 1971, 1971 (c.2), 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973 (three copies), 1974, 1975, 1976 (three copies), 1978 (two copies), 1979 (two copies), 1980 (three copies), 1982 (two copies), 1983, 1984, 1985 (two copies), 1986 (two copies), 1987 (two copies), 1988, 1989 (2 copies), 1990 (4 copies), 1991 (2 copies), 1992 (2 copies)

West Virginia State College, (Institute, Kanawha County), "The Arch," 1958, 1958 (c.2), 1959, 1960, 1960 (c.2), 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967,1967 (c.2), 1968, 1968 (c.2), 1969, 1970, 1970 (2 copies), 1971, 1972, 1972 (c.2), 1973, 1973 (c.2), 1974, 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1975 (c.2), 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1979 (c.2), 1981, 1982, 1982 (c.2), 1983, 1983 (c.2), 1984, 1986, 1988, 1989 (2 copies), 1990, 1990 (c.2), 1991, 1992, 1992 (c.2), 1993, 1994, 1995 (2 copies), 1996 (3 copies), 1998, 2000 (2 copies), 2001, 2002, 2003

West Virginia University (Morgantown, Monongalia County), "Monticola," Vol. 1 1896 (three copies), Vol. 2 1900 (2 copies), Vol. 3 1900-1901, 1900-1901 (c.2), Vol. 4 1901 (2 copies), 1904, 1904 (2 copies), 1905, 1905 (c.2), 1906, 1907 (2 copies), 1908, 1908 (2 copies), 1909 (2 copies), 1910, 1911 (2 copies), 1912, 1912 (c.2), 1913, 1914, 1914 (c.2), 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1918 (2 copies), 1919, 1919 (c.2), 1920, 1920 (2 copies), 1921, 1921 (c.2), 1922, 1922 (c.2), 1923, 1923 (2 copies), 1924, 1924 (c.2), 1925, 1925 (c.2), 1926, 1926 (c.2), 1927, 1928, 1928 (c.2), 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1930, 1930 (c.2), 1931, 1931 (c.2), 1932, 1932 (2 copies), 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1936 (c.2), 1937, 1937 (2 copies), 1938, 1939, 1939 (c.2), 1940, 1940 (c.2), 1941, 1941 (c.2), 1942, 1942 (2 copies), 1943, 1943 (2 copies), 1947, 1947 (2 copies), 1948, 1948 (c. 2), 1954, 1955, 1955 (2 copies), 1956, 1956 (c.2), 1957, 1957 (2 copies), 1958, 1958 (c.2), 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1967 (3 copies), 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984

West Virginia University School of Dentistry and Division of Dental Hygiene (Morgantown, Monongalia County), "Impressions," 1970

West Virginia University School of Medicine (Morgantown, Monongalia County), "Pylon," 1963, 1964, 1972, 1974, 1976

West Virginia Wesleyan College (Buckhannon, Upshur County), "Murmurmontis," 1904, 1904 (2 copies), 1905, 1905 (c.2), 1906, 1906 (c.2), 1907 (Vol. IV), 1907 (c.2), 1910 (Vol. VI), 1911, 1912, 1914, 1915, 1915 (c.2), 1916, 1917 (two copies), 1918, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934 (Vol. XXX), 1937 (Vol. XXXI) (c.2), 1938 (c.2), 1939 (c.2), 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1963 (c.2), 1964, 1964 (2 copies), 1965, 1965 (c.2), 1966, 1966 (c.2), 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973 (2 copies), 1974 (2 copies), 1975, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008

Weston High School (Lewis County), "The Blue and Gray," 1923 (Vol. I) "The Collicola," 1926 (Vol.II), 1927, 1928, 1929, 1931, 1932, 1937, 1947, 1948, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1967

Wheeling College, (Ohio County), "Manifest," 1964 (Vol. VI), 1965, 1966, 1967, 1967 (c. 2), 1968, 1969, 1976

Wheeling High School (Ohio County), "The Record," April 1915, 1919, 1921, Dec. 1921, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1928 (c. 2), 1929, 1930, 1930 (3 copies), 1931, 1931 (c. 2), 1932, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1943, 1947, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1965, 1966

Wheeling Park High School, (Ohio County), "The Patriot," 1978, 1983 (Vol.7), 1983 (c. 2), 1984, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

White Sulphur Springs High School (Greenbrier County), "Devil's Diary," 1961 (Vol. III), 1962

Whitmer High School (Randolph County), Senior class picture (named individual head shots). 1961

Williams District H. S. (Williamstown, Wood County) "The Maroon and Gold," 1925 (Vol.I), 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1948 "Wihishan," 1962

Williamson High School (Mingo County), "The Tug River Breeze," 1921 (Vol. II), 1922 (Vol. III), 1925, 1925 (c. 2), 1930, 1930 (c.2), 1931, 1931 (c. 2), 1932, 1933, 1956

Williamstown Christian School, "The Shield," 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980

Winfield High School (Putnam County), "Memoirs," 1933-1934, "The General," 1949, 1980, 1981, 2002, 2003, 2004

Winfield Middle School, unnamed, 2004

Wirt County High School, "The Elizabethan," 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1957 (c.2), 1958, 1959, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1980

Woodrow Wilson High School (Beckley, Raleigh County) "The Echo," 1922, 1923, 1924, 1924 (c.2), 1925 (2 copies), 1926 (2 copies), 1927, 1927 (2 copies), 1928, 1928 (c.2), 1929, 1929 (c.2), 1930, 1930 (c.2), 1931, 1931 (c.2), 1932, 1932 (c.2), 1933, 1933 (c.2), 1935, 1935 (c.2), 1936, 1937, 1938, 1938 (c.2), 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945 (2 copies), 1946, 1946 (2 copies), 1947, 1947 (2 copies), 1948 (3 copies), 1949 (2 copies), 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1958 (c.2), 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1968, 1968 (c.2), 1969, 1969 (c.2), 1970, 1970 (c.2), 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1976 (c.2), 1977, 1978 (2 copies), 1980, 1980 (c.2), 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007

Woodrow Wilson Junior High School (Charleston, Kanawha County), "The Wilsonian," June 1931, January 1932, January 1933, June 1933, February 1934, January 1941, June 1941, 1942 (two copies), 1951, 1953, 1954, 1955 (2 copies), 1957, 1958, 1959

Wyoming East High School (New Richmond, Wyoming County), "The Warrior," 1999

*Denotes artificially created class books

Box 1:
Adamston Junior High
Andrew Jackson Junior High
Barboursville High
Beaver High
Bethany College
Bluefield High
Bluefield State
Bristol High
Burnsville High
Cedar Grove High
Charleston High (2 folders)
Clendenin High
Dupont High
Dupont Junior High
East Bank High
Fairmont High
Fairmont State
Fairview High
Farmington High
Frankfort High
Gary District High
Gauley Bridge High
Gilbert High
Glenville State
Greenbank High
Greenbrier High
Greenbrier Military
Greenbrier West
Hamlin High

Box 2:
Hamlin High
Hampshire High
Hedgesville High
Herbert Hoover High
Huntington High
Hurricane High
Jane Lew High
Jefferson Junior High
Lincoln Junior High
Logan High
Lumberport High
Magnolia High
Marshall High
Marshall University
Martinsburg High
Mercer School
Miller Junior High
Milton Junior High
Montgomery High
Moorefield High
Morgantown High
Morris Harvey College
Moundsville High
Mount de Chantal
New Cumberland High
Nicholas County High
Nitro High
Normantown Junior and Senior High
Northfork High
Notre Dame High
Parkersburg High

Box 3:
Parsons High
Petersburg High
Pineville High
Poca District High
Point Pleasant High
Potomac State College
Princeton High
Rainelle High
Rupert High
St. Albans High
St. Marys High
Salem College
Sand Fork High
Scott High
Shady Spring High
Shepherd College
Sherman High
Sherrard High
Shinnston High
Sophia High
South Charleston High
Spencer High
Stoco High

Box 4:
Stonewall Jackson High
Terra Alta High
Thomas Jefferson Junior High
Towers School
Triadelphia High
Van High
Victory High
Wahama High
Washington Irving High
Weir High
Welch High
West Liberty Normal School
West Virginia State College
West Virginia University
West Virginia Wesleyan College
Weston High
Wheeling High
Williamstown High
Woodrow Wilson High
Woodrow Wilson Junior High

Scrapbooks:
Charleston junior and high schools 1920s
Greenbrier College 1926-27

School newspapers/magazines:
Bristol High School, Bristolite, scattered issues, 1944-1945
Charleston High School, Book Strap, 1934 1939-40 1945-46 1964-66
Clendenin High School, Mountain Echo, 1934-35
East Bank Middle School - 1959-1968, 1973-1979, 1980-81
Fayetteville High School, Vandalia, scattered issues 1940-43
Franklin High School, The Mountaineer, December 1947
George Washington High School, Booklet, 1968
Greenbrier High School, The Gossip, 1948-1954
Lincoln Jr. High School, The Lincoln Log, 1968-70
Mannington High School, Hi-Tower, 1931
Marshall College, Parthenon, 1949
Milton High School, Miltonian, 1935-36
Mountain State College, Mountain Echo, 1952
Nitro High School, Spyglass, 1944-46 Microscope, 1946 Kanawha Valley Leader, 1945
Richwood High School, Woodchopper, 1968
Stonewall Jackson High School, Jackson Journal, 1940-42, Christmas 1950
Thomas Jefferson Jr. High School, School Newspaper, The Amateur Reporter, 1937-38 The Jeffersonian, 1953-1956
Woodrow Wilson Jr. High School, School Newspaper, Woodrow Wilson News, 1950-1953

Oversized documents:
Diploma, elementary school to Frankie Holland, June 15, 1926
Memory book of Bobby Faye Hubb, Parsons High, class of 1940 (includes senior class photo)

Photos:
Barboursville High School
Belington High School composite of senior classes 1948, 1958
Carroll High School, Hamlin, 1933-34 sophomores, 1935 May graduates
Crum High School band 1951
East Side High School, Fairmont
Fairmont High School, Kibo Club 1946
Fairmont State College
Glenville State College
Hamlin High School
Huntington High School reunion
Kanawha Elementary School
Logan High School class of 1936 50th reunion
Magnolia High School
Marsh Fork High School, 1948-1953
Morgantown High School class of 1973 20th reunion
Moundsville High School reunion groups
Mountain State Business College panoramic of Parkersburg with area pointing to school location
New River State School
Paden City High School composite, Class of 1962
Parkersburg High School, panoramic of school and students 1927
Potomac State College, Catamount staff 1948
Rowlesburg High School, cast of play "South is South" 1939
Salem College Class of 1936 at reunion (50th?)
Sherrard Junior High School wrestling team 1978 (2 photos)
Smithfield High School
South Charleston High School Girl Reserves and X-ray staff, both 1928
Stonewall Jackson High School
Thomas Jefferson Junior High School, 8th grade 1954-55
Unidentified
Victory High School
Weir High School band 1966
Wellsburg High School, Composite Class of 1962
West Virginia University, Drivers Education, 1955
Wheeling High School
Woodrow Wilson High School

Oversized photos:
Belington High School, composite class of 1937
Cowen High School, composite class of 1942
Doddridge High School, composite class of 1935
Lost Creek High School, composite class of 1945
Man High School, senior class 1950
Wheeling High School, composite class of 1952, 1953
Whitmer High School, composite class of 1961


Watch the video: Catching the Eye of Success with Julia Kibela (September 2022).


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